Los Santos County Sheriff

Under the direction of Sheriff N. Clark, The County Sheriff's office has the largest Law Enforcement Jurisdiction of San Andreas, Covering the entire State.


Divisions of The CSO:

  • K-9 Patrol
  • Special Response Team (SRT)
  • Motor Patrol
  • Sniper Team
  • Detective Squad

Mission Statement:

The Los Santos County Sheriff's Department (LSSD) is the local county law enforcement agency operating in Los Santos County, San Andreras. The LSSD also has jurisdiction to operate in Blaine County. D‚Äčeputies can be found doing traffic enforcement along the Great Ocean Highway, Senora Freeway, and Senora Way.

History of the CSO

The Los Santos Sheriff's Department was established in 1850 shortly after the Mexican-American War. After the founding of the independent San Andreas Republic and the voluntary annexation by the United States, law enforcement was subsumed under the Los Santos Rangers (which became the Los Santos Police Department) and the Los Santos Sheriff.

The "frontier era" of Los Santos saw the worst era of organized crime in the county, as the gold rush brought a massive population explosion and crime. The Union Pacific Railroad Company brought another explosion, and it caused a string of 15 Sheriffs, several of which were killed in gunfights, to enter a veritable revolving door. Up until after the civil war, the Sheriff's Department consisted of the Sheriff and Cronies as deputies.

In the early 1900s, the Sheriff's Department officially became an actual institution of permanent individuals rather than the Sheriff and his posse. It was not until 1930 when deputies formally adopted uniforms and jails were administered by the Sheriff's Department. During the 1930s, the Sheriff's Department assisted the Los Santos Police Department in the "red squad" era, notably attacking the Socialist Party of America and breaking up union-organized events.

In 1947, the Sheriff's Department hired the first female Deputy Sheriff within the nation, Margaret Gueen Adam.(Pictured Right)

The 1950s to the 1970s saw the most turbulent era of operation within the Sheriff's Department, especially during the infamous 1961 Davis Race Riots. The Sheriff's Department assisted the LSPD in quelling the large-scale civil unrest, but it was one of the most massive events of the era up until the 1992 Jim Queen riots.

Former Sheriff Peter "Pico" Collins headed the department from 2009 until his downfall in 2017. During Collins' reign corruption was rampant and close-knight deputy gangs were prominent. Within the ranks of the county's finest were individuals keen to oppress less fortunate individuals in the county jail system and rural towns. Following whistle-blower tips, an ACLU lawsuit brought down the Sheriff after the FBI took interest as part of their public corruption mandate. Pico and his Undersheriff were both sentenced to federal prison.

Following a brief hiatus mandated by the Federal Department of Justice, Patrick Machado won the seat as Los Santos County Sheriff after a special election was held. Almost immediately after swearing into office, Sheriff Machado ordered the re-opening of the Twin Towers Los Santos County Jail to massively aid the growing overcrowding issue of the region's detention facilities.

In August 2020, a massive public outcry demanded the resignation of Sheriff Machado following several days of demonstrations and riots after deputies were accused of racially motivated misconduct. Sheriff Machado stepped down from the position of Sheriff and was immediately replaced by acting Sheriff Richard Washington, the first African American Sheriff of Los Santos County. Following his swearing in as the interim Sheriff, Washington has promised to continue to root out corruption and misconduct in the Department, specifically targeting the rampant problem of "deputy gangs" who are allegedly involved in activities such as extortion, assaults, and extensive coverups of police misconduct.

Elections for the new Sheriff were held in September 2020 as planned before Sheriff Machado's resignation. Interim Sheriff Washington did not decide to run and instead urged his Undersheriff, Nick Clark to run for office in his place. Clark was elected without any opposition and officially assumed the office at the 1st of October, 2020.